Review: The Hiding Place

I use Grammarly for proofreading because “their’s know explanashun kneaded.”

One day while browsing in Target, I decided to take a peek in the book section.  I wasn’t looking to buy a book; being a book enthusiast I just wanted to see what was out there and to see if anything would attract my interest.  Scanning the shelves, I came across The Hiding Place’s eerily blue colored cover art.  Immediately the picture drew me in, and I picked up the book.  See, it is very true what they say – the cover artwork can sell a book, and in this case, it did.  Once I had the book in my hand the next logical step was to read the back cover.  From there, I wanted to read the story between these two pages; the beautiful art covered the front and an interesting storyline described on the back.

The Hiding Place
by David Bell

The-Hiding-Place-by-David-Bell

When scanning the books displayed on the shelf, the artwork on this book drew my attention.

The Hiding Place describes to the reader a mysterious history involving a woman whose younger brother was murdered.  Janet Manning grew up in Dove Point, a small town in Ohio, and she carries around the memories surrounding her brother’s disappearance and death.   It’s been twenty five years since the murder and Dante, the man convicted of the crime, has been released from jail.  He has moved back to Dove Point, and along with his release comes the unwanted media attention.

As Janet tries to deal with all these emotional events, a mysterious man arrives at her front door to tell her that he has new information to share regarding Justin’s death.  The impromptu visit stirs uncertainty in Janet.  She begins to question her memories surrounding Justin’s disappearance and believes Dante, the man she helped put in prison, might be innocent after all…just like he has been declaring all these years.   The truth is soon to be discovered, but is Janet ready to know the truth about that fateful day?

Although the story surrounding Justin’s death is a sad one, I was pulled into the lives of the Manning family, especially Janet.  Her emotions portrayed in the book drew the reader into her world and helped to bring the story to life.  Actually, all the characters in the book felt real to me which made the story more believable.

The Hiding Place kept my interest from page one.  The author, David Bell, did a fine job in keeping the reader intrigued throughout the story.  There were some nice twists (and turns) within the story that made me wonder if Justin was indeed alive, or if he was murdered.  The suspenseful writing had me turning the pages, even when tired, in order to find out if my suspicions about certain characters were true or not.  Excellent writing when an author can keep your attention that way.

Due to the topic of the story, I would recommend the reader be at least fourteen to fifteen years of age.  There was not any gory or overly descriptive scenes, but the death of a small child can be a sensitive subject.  The Hiding Place is a book for both men and women.  Although the protagonist is female, there are a lot of important supporting characters that will appeal to both sexes.  This book includes a reader’s guide in the back which is full of thought provoking questions which makes it a good candidate for those in a Reader’s Club.

I can honestly say that my trip to Target was a successful one, and  I am happy to have this title in my book collection.

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Grammarly is an automated online proofreader that finds and explains grammar, spelling, and punctuation mistakes in all types of writing.

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